Ireland stands to gain €4m from the inclusion of aviation in emissions trading

9th November 2012
Press Release

While a number of airlines continue to lobby against the inclusion of aviation in the EU emissions trading scheme, An Taisce - the National Trust for Ireland, has come out strongly in favour of the proposal.

According to the National Trust, Ireland stands to gain €3.75m of much-needed revenue if aviation emissions are included and this would have no impact on the most vulnerable in society. Research shows that it is it is the wealthy who fly the most.[1]

This revenue could spare the imposition of the cruelest cuts currently being implemented, including the taking away of home help care, the withdrawal earlier this week of one hour per week of assistance from an 89 year old lady in Cork being a case in point.

When passed through to passengers, the cost would be 20 - 30 cents for a flight from Ireland to UK or the continent and €3 for transatlantic journeys.

When attention is drawn to the environmental damage caused by aviation, more than 80% believe that flying should not remain unrestricted, according to a recent study. [1] (While the survey was completed in the UK, it is likely that the results would be replicated in Ireland.)

"If we want to reduce the severity of extreme weather events linked to climate change emissions, then we need disincentives to harming the climate", said James Nix, who works with Europe-wide advocacy group, Transport & Environment, which is affiliated to An Taisce in Ireland.

An Taisce draws attention to the conclusion of The Economist:

"A hundred years from now, looking back, the only question that will appear important about the historical moment in which we now live is the question of whether or not we did anything to arrest climate change. Everything else—the financial crisis, the life or death of the euro ... or another four years of Barack—all this will fade into insignificance beside the question of whether we managed to do anything about human industrial civilisation changing the climate of Planet Earth.[2]

ENDS

For further information, please call:

Charles Stanley-Smith, An Taisce Communications - Tel: 087 2411995

An Taisce The National Trust for Ireland