Buildings at Risk

The Project

The Buildings at Risk Register is an unfunded project by An Taisce – the National Trust for Ireland supported and maintained by its voluntary members. The Buildings at Risk Register was put in place in response to a concern at the growing number of structures that are vacant and falling into a state of disrepair. The Register provides information on structures of architectural, historical, archaeological, artistic, cultural, scientific, social or technical interest throughout the country that are considered to be at risk.

29th August 2020

Mayo Council Council is commended for taking on the Moore Hall Estate near Ballinrobe as a heritage attraction and public and tourist amenity following decades of neglect by Coillte.

23rd August 2020

A look back at a recent positive heritage outcome at Thomas Street in Dublin's Liberties.

10th July 2020

The ‘Top 10 Most-at-Risk Buildings’ list is compiled and updated by An Taisce annually. The Buildings-at-Risk Register was put in place in response to the growing number of structures that are vacant and are falling into a state of disrepair. The assessment of risk is directly associated with the condition of the structure and not the external processes affecting it.

10th July 2020

The ‘Top 10 Most-at-Risk Buildings’ list is compiled and updated by An Taisce annually.

17th June 2020

Protecting the built heritage of Dublin in the 2020s is not for the faint-hearted, with frantic levels of activity and seemingly everything being done to facilitate short-term economic interests at the longterm sustainability, beauty and setting of this historic city.

4th June 2020

Meath has always had a strong reverence for heritage and the natural environment. This did not get much attention in J. Stirling Coyne’s The Scenery and Antiquities of Ireland (1842) but Colonel William Burton who resided at Slane Castle and later adopted the family name Conyngham, founded the Hibernian Antiquarian Society in 1779 to promote Irish ancient buildings abroad.

28th May 2020

In the many years, too many to count, that I have been in Meath An Taisce, I have never ceased to be amazed by the commitment of its members to recording, and striving to save the vernacular features of our landscape. Right back from the time of Mrs Russell, who as planning officer in those days walked many miles watching and recording planning applications and buildings at risk, to our present members, their dedication has never wavered and it will not now.

29th November 2019

Conversion of No. 15 Usher’s Island, setting for James Joyce’s The Dead, to a 56-bed hostel would not be appropriate.

No. 15 Usher’s Island is a handsome three-bay house of the late-Georgian period, with four-storey redbrick elevation over raised basement, and columned stone doorcase. The interior retains a good degree of refined early-19th century detail.

The principal importance of the house is its place in literary history as the setting for James Joyce’s The Dead, described by TS Eliot as “one of the greatest short stories ever written”.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Buildings at Risk